Postgraduate research opportunities

Our Geology and Environmental Sciences PhD programmes are suitable for students wishing to pursue a PhD which aligns to one of our Earth Systems Research Group themes. Often staff work across themes and are happy for you to get in contact with them to discuss your proposed research. Staff contact details are contained within each of the theme pages.  

Our Human Geography PhD programme is suitable for students wishing to pursue a PhD which aligns to one of our Human Geography Research Group themes.

James McCune Smith PhD Scholarships

The James McCune Smith Scholarships fund Black UK students to undertake PhD research at the University. They provide an enhanced experience through external mentors, placements, leadership training, community-building activities and networking opportunities. The Scholarships are named after James McCune Smith, who graduated from the University of Glasgow in 1837 as the first African American to receive a medical degree.

Please see the attached flyer for more information: JMS PhD Scholarhip 2023

Please see the following attachment for more information on proposal guidance: JMS PhD Scholarship Proposal Guidance

 

Fully funded Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) studentship

Fully funded Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) studentship starting October 2024

A 3.5-year studentship covering both stipend and fees and is open to UK and international applicants. The available projects are listed below.

The entry requirement is a 2.1 Honours degree or equivalent in geology, Earth science, planetary science, materials science or a cognate discipline. The application deadline is Wednesday 31 January 2024, interviews will be held in mid-late February 2023, and the studentship will start in October 2024.

Information on how to apply is here, and the principal supervisor can be contacted directly for more information.

Further information on STFC studentships is available here.

 

A full project outline is linked from each project title:

 

Tracking the geological evolution of C-complex asteroids using carbonates

Martin Lee (Martin.Lee@Glasgow.ac.uk), Luke Daly, Sammy Griffin

 

Shocking details about the death of the dinosaurs from alkali feldspars

Martin Lee (Martin.Lee@Glasgow.ac.uk), Annemarie Pickersgill (SUERC), Luke Daly

 

Mapping the Phase Space of Fe-Ni alloys in Meteorites: revealing the chemical and crystallographic complexity of REE-free magnet analogues

Joshua F. Einsle (joshuafranz.einsle@glasgow.ac.uk), Luke Daly, Claire Nichols (Oxford), Paul Bagot (Oxford)

 

Deep Earth volatiles and the source of water on rocky terrestrial planets

Lydia Hallis (Lydia.Hallis@Glasgow.ac.uk), Sami Mikhail (St Andrews)

 

Analogues for lunar and martian sample return missions– What does Scotland have to offer?

Lydia Hallis (Lydia.Hallis@Glasgow.ac.uk), Iain Neill

 

Heavy metal insights into the formation of Planet Earth

Luke Daly (Luke.Daly@Glasgow.ac.uk), Leanne Staddon, Joshua F. Einsle

 

A data driven multiscale approach for understanding the Solar Systems oldest materials

Luke Daly (Luke.Daly@Glasgow.ac.uk), Joshua F. Einsle

PhD opportunity: College Scholarship (Geographical & Earth Sciences)

The School of Geographical & Earth Sciences (GES) is able to offer two College PhD Scholarships to begin 1st October 2024. Each scholarship will be awarded to a student of outstanding ability and academic potential seeking to undertake a PhD on a topic that complements the current research activities of either the Earth Systems Science Research Group (ESSRG) or the Human Geography Research Group (HGRG). The ESSRG research themes can be found at https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/ges/research/earthsystemsresearch/ and HGRG research themes can be found at https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/ges/research/humangeographyresearch/.

The award provides for UK tuition costs* as well as an annual stipend in line with the Research Council rate (currently at £18,622) over the course of three and a half years, and the provision of up to £1000 per annum in research monies.

* The award covers UK tuition fee costs. There may be scope for an international tuition fee waiver to be provided by the School for an outstanding candidate, but this is not guaranteed. International applicants may consider providing the difference between UK tuition fees and international tuition fees through alternate sources.

Competition Process.

We invite applicants to apply by submitting:

  1. A Research Proposal of maximum 2000 words (in Word, not PDF) comprising title, proposed supervisors, introduction to the project, aims and objectives, research and policy context (if relevant) and potential impact (if relevant), research methodology, provisional schedule, and bibliography; Proposals that are interdisciplinary are especially welcome.
  2. A maximum two-page CV;
  3. Applicant statement, maximum 500 words, on how your qualifications, skills, attributes and experience fit with the requirements of the proposed research project. You may include reference to relevant education, training, work/voluntary experience and personal interests;
  4. Degree transcripts in English (Undergraduate and Masters, if relevant).

The research proposal must be your own work, but your proposed supervisor may guide and advise you on developing and improving the proposal.

Please email these documents to Leenah Khan (Leenah.khan@glasgow) by 5pm Glasgow time February 29th, 2024 using the subject ‘College Scholarship application’. Applications after this time/date will not be considered.

Applicants should also ask one referee to send a reference letter in support of their application to Leenah.khan@glasgow.ac.uk by February 29th, clearly stating the name of the applicant and the project in the email subject line.

Selection Process.

  • Stage 1. After the application deadline the applications will be checked to ensure all requested information has been provided. All eligible applications will then move forward to Stage 2.
  • Stage 2. An assessment panel with no conflict of interest will assess all eligible applications to select a shortlist for interview. Interviews are expected to take place on the week beginning 18th March.
  • Stage 3. Post interview the preferred candidate will be asked to undertake a formal application to the University of Glasgow College of Science and Engineering Graduate School and will be proposed for approval by the College so that a formal offer can be made.

Due to the expected volume of applicants, it will not be possible to provide individual feedback to applicants who are not shortlisted.

PhD opportunity: Xenoliths in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites as treasure troves of early Solar System history

Xenoliths in carbonaceous chondrite meteorites as treasure troves of early Solar System history

 

Supervisors: Professor Martin Lee, Dr Sammy GriffinDr Luke Daly

 

Aims: This project will explore the dynamics and composition of our Solar System during its tumultuous birth ~4.5 billion years ago by studying fragments of highly primitive asteroids that are preserved as xenoliths in meteorites. The xenoliths were broken from their parent asteroids during catastrophic collisions, then moved through the protoplanetary disk to eventually be incorporated into other asteroids – it is pieces of these secondary asteroids that have fallen to Earth as meteorites. The xenoliths that they contain therefore preserve a record of asteroids that ‘lived fast and died young’ and as such can provide unique insights into the origin of our Solar System.

Context: Thousands of meteorites are available for study, the majority of which are from asteroids that orbit the Sun between Mars and Jupiter. The most primitive meteorites are the carbonaceous chondrites, which are derived from C-complex asteroids that populate the cold and dark outer reaches of the asteroid belt. One such meteorite fell in Winchcombe, Gloucestershire, in 2021 (O’Brien et al. 2022). The carbonaceous chondrites are of great interest because they contain primordial water and organic matter. Those meteorites that fell to Earth early in its history may therefore have bought with them a host of bio-essential compounds that eventually enabled life to evolve.

Despite their importance, carbonaceous chondrite meteorites are inherently limited in the information that can provide about early Solar System evolution. They are derived from the present-day population of asteroids and even then, meteorites can only be delivered to Earth from certain parts of the asteroid belt. In addition, only sufficiently tough rocks can survive the high pressures and temperatures of passage through Earth’s atmosphere. By contrast, xenoliths are fragments of asteroids that formed whilst the Solar System was very young but may have been long since destroyed, and they are protected from the rigours of atmospheric entry by their enclosing meteorite so that even the most fragile lithologies can survive (Nittler et al. 2019).

Objectives: Xenoliths are very abundant in some meteorites belonging to the CM group of carbonaceous chondrites (e.g., Lindgren et al. 2013). They can preserve a rich record of the geological history of their parent asteroids through assemblages of minerals including carbonates and phyllosilicates, and textures including mineral veins and compactional petrofabrics. Using these and other features of the xenoliths we will seek to understand how their parent asteroids evolved including evidence for the presence and flow of liquid water, and the extent to which they were deformed by impacts prior to breaking apart. During their transfer between asteroids the xenoliths have accreted finer grained material that was also free-floating in the protoplanetary disk, and bought it with them into the secondary asteroid. The xenoliths thus also serve as a form of ‘witness plate’, collecting and sampling a variety of materials that were present in the early protoplanetary disk.

Techniques, training and career prospects: The student will be trained to characterise the xenoliths and their host meteorites using an array of conventional tools (e.g., scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, electron probe microanalysis, secondary ion mass spectrometry, transmission electron microscopy) and emerging analytical techniques (i.e., X-ray tomography, atom probe tomography and transmission Kikuchi diffraction). They will become part of a lively team of planetary scientists in Glasgow and will work within a vibrant research community in the UK and internationally. The student will have ample opportunity to travel widely in the UK and internationally in order to undertake research and present results. The student will gain subject specific and generic skills that can lead to employment in areas such as resource exploration, environmental management and space science.

Application procedure: The project is suitable for a graduate with a good honours degree in Geology or Earth Science with an interest in Planetary Science. There are two routes to apply for this PhD project.

If you have your own funding there is no deadline, and you can apply at https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/research/geology/.

This project may be eligible for a College of Science and Engineering Scholarship (available to UK, EU and International students). The application deadline is likely to be at the end of January 2024, and further details will be posted here: https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/ges/research/postgraduate/

 

Please contact the principal supervisor with any questions (Martin.Lee@Glasgow.ac.uk).

 

References

Lindgren, P., Lee, M.R., Sofe, M.R. and Zolensky, M.E. (2013) Clasts in the CM2 carbonaceous chondrite Lonewolf Nunataks 94101: Evidence for aqueous alteration prior to complex mixing. Meteoritics & Planetary Science 48, 1074-1090.

Nittler, L. R., Stoud, R. M., Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M., De Gregorio B. T., Alexander C. M . O'D., Davidson, J., Moyano-Cambero, C. E., and Tanbakouei, S. (2019) A cometary building block in a primitive asteroidal meteorite. Nature Astronomy 3, 659–666.

O'Brien, A. C., Pickersgill, A., Daly, L., Jenkins, L., Floyd, C., Martin, P.-E., Hallis, L. J., King, A. and Lee, M. (2022) The Winchcombe Meteorite: one year on. Astronomy and Geophysics 63(1), 1.21-1.23.

PhD opportunity: Shocking details about the death of the dinosaurs from alkali feldspars

Shocking details about the death of the dinosaurs from alkali feldspars

 

Supervisors: Martin Lee1, Annemarie Pickersgill2, Luke Daly1

1School of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Glasgow 2Scottish Universities Environmental Research Center, East Kilbride

 

Aims: The impact of a ~12 km diameter asteroid sixty-six million years ago caused one of the most devastating mass extinctions in Earth history. Many groups of plants and animals including the non-avian dinosaurs succumbed to a cascade of environmental changes following the event (Morgan et al. 2022). The ‘smoking gun’ of this impact is the 200 km diameter Chicxulub structure in Mexico, and detailed analysis of its rocks has revealed a wealth of information on the event itself and its effects on the Earth system. Fragments of alkali feldspars that were ejected into the Earth’s atmosphere from the shocked target rocks may have played a major role in post-impact climate change (Pankhurst et al. 2022). Given their potential importance, this project seeks to better understand how alkali feldspars respond to hypervelocity impacts through the analysis of Chicxulub, and other impact structures in the geological record.

Background: In 2016 the Chicxulub impact structure was drilled by IODP-ICDP Expedition 364 (Morgan et al. 2017). The target rock comprised carbonates and evaporites overlying a granitoid basement (Feignon et al. 2021). The basement lithologies experienced pressures of ~16–18 GPa, with most minerals showing evidence for shock deformation. Alkali feldspar is abundant in the basement granite but its response to the impact has received less attention than other common rock-forming minerals. Given that the structure has been so intensively studied, Chicxulub therefore offers an excellent opportunity to characterise the impact deformation of alkali feldspar including the nature of shock-formed microstructures, and any associated chemical and isotopic alteration. Another very important reason for focusing on alkali feldspar is that it is highly effective in nucleating clouds (Harrison et al. 2016) and so may play a major role in the environmental repercussions of impact events (Coldwell et al. 2019; Pankhurst et al. 2017, 2022).

Objectives: This project will characterise the mineralogy, microstructure and chemical/isotopic composition of alkali feldspars from the Chicxulub granite together with samples from other impact structures (e.g., Ries in Germany and Rochechouart in France), and unshocked granites for comparison. This project will use conventional imaging and microanalysis techniques (e.g., scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis) together with specialist tools for characterising microstructures over length scales from millimetres (electron backscatter diffraction) to nanometres (transmission Kikuchi diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography). The outcome of this work will be a new understanding of the response of alkali feldspars to hypervelocity impacts, and how such shock deformation may affect their role in environmental change.

Training, and career prospects: The student will be trained in petrology, mineralogy and geochemistry, and will be part of a lively team of planetary scientists in Glasgow. There will be ample opportunity to travel widely in the UK and internationally in order to undertake research and present results. After graduation the student could work in areas such as space science, environmental management or materials science

Application procedure: The project is suitable for a graduate with a good honours degree in Geology or Earth Science. There are two routes to apply for this PhD project. If you have your own funding there is no deadline, and you can apply at https://www.gla.ac.uk/postgraduate/research/geology/. Please contact the principal supervisor with any questions (Martin.Lee@Glasgow.ac.uk). This project may be eligible for a College of Science and Engineering Scholarship (available to UK, EU and international students). The application deadline is likely to be at the end of January 2024, and further details will be posted here: https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/ges/research/postgraduate/.

 

References

Coldwell, B.C. and Pankhurst, M.J. (2019) Evaluating the influence of meteorite impact events on global potassium feldspar availability to the atmosphere since 600 Ma. Journal of the Geological Society 176, 209–224.

Feignon, J.-G., de Graaff, S. J., Ferrière, L., Kaskes, P., Déhais, T., Goderis, S., Claeys, P. and Koeberl, C. (2021), Chicxulub impact structure, IODP-ICDP Expedition 364 drill core: Geochemistry of the granite basement. Meteoritics and Planetary Science 56, 1243–1273.

Harrison, A.D., Whale, T. F., Carpenter, M. A., Holden, M., Neve, L., O'Sullivan, D., Vergara Temprado, J. and Murray, B. J. (2016) Not all feldspar is equal: a survey of ice nucleating properties across the feldspar group of minerals. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 1–26.

Morgan, J.V., Bralower, T.J., Brugger, J. et al. (2022) The Chicxulub impact and its environmental consequences. Nature Reviews Earth and Environment 3, 338–354.

Morgan J., Gulick S., Mellet C.L., Green S. L., and Expedition 364 Scientists. (2017) Chicxulub: Drilling the K-Pg impact crater. Proceedings of the International Ocean Discovery Program, 364. College Station, Texas: International Ocean Discovery Program. 164 p.

Pankhurst, M.J., Stevenson, C J. and Coldwell, B.C. (2022) Meteorites that produce K-feldspar-rich ejecta blankets correspond to mass extinctions. Journal of the Geological Society 179.

Pankhurst, M.J. (2017) Atmospheric K-feldspar as a potential climate modulating agent through geologic time. Geology 45, 379–382.